Monday, May 22, 2017

Notes from the 2017 Teaching & Learning Conference

At this year’s Teaching and Learning Conference, SNL Writing presented in the Reflection and Metacognition session. Maria De Moya and Sydney Dillard from the College of Communication opened this session with an overview of reflective tools that instructors could bring into the classroom. Steffanie Triller, Kamilah Cummings and Nicholas Hayes closed the session with a conversation on how to use specifically design reflection questions to promote metacognition at various stages of an assignment.

SNL Writing shared typical reflective questions we have students answer at the end of each draft of a paper. These questions have students articulate what they are actually doing in their papers, what their strengths are, and what their weaknesses are. Fortified with this knowledge they will be able to lead their own improvements in their assignments rather than simply reacting to instructor comments. But the beautiful thing is that these types of questions are adaptable across disciplines.

Despite serving different populations and having different disciplines, both presentations recognized the deep benefit of fostering reflection especially as a way to engage in formative development before summative assessment. Participating in this session was a poignant reminder that although SNL has a particularly close relation to reflection it should be a skill that students learn to cultivate for themselves in any given situation. Crucially, these skill sets can help learners avoid the inefficiency of trial and error (“Practice-Based and Reflective Learning” and “Reflective Writing”).

Works Cited

“Practice-based and Reflective Learning.” University of Reading, 2016, libguides.reading.ac.uk/reflective.

“Reflective Writing.” Writing Center: School of Graduate & Professional Programs. Saint Mary’s University of Minnesota, 2011, www2.smumn.edu/deptpages/tcwritingcenter/forms_of_writing/reflect_essay.php.

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